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educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their skills. to
wanted to point out that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay.
-- sorry, the june first day in june, june 2. we have reached an agreement with united educators for a two-year agreement. and both years have one-and-a-half of forced closure days. the half closure day is on the last day of school, noted on may 30. and then june 2 is the professional development day which also is a forced closure for our teachers. that's a furlough day. so we are pleased that in the school year is 179.5 days for the 13-14 year. and again those forced closure days may be revisited in the course based on the district and finances. >> okay. it's very timely as i got an e-mail today from someone asking me when the first day of school was in august. thank you for being so timely. >> thank you, madam president, this it will be the district website tomorrow. >> great, assuming we pass it. roll call please. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas,>> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> yes. >> unanimous. >> thank you. next item is -- let's see, informational items. initial proposals. i announce the signing of the following two proposals. 2012
>> good evening members of the board of education. congratulations new vice president fewer. don't mean to interrupt you while you are eating. and of course president norton, i believe president of the school board is the highest that anyone norton has risen since joshua crowned himself emperor. >> there is hope for me yet. >> we are talking about substitutes and like san francisco the sub -- substitutes are part of the union. they keep the classes going when teachers cannot be present. substitutes are the vice presidents for every teacher ready to step in and carry on if an emergency occurs. substitutes are the relief pitcher in the baseball of education. substitutes are the understudies to the teachers that star on stage. in california there are several categories of substitutes. we will talk about core substitutes and return to other substitute issues at future meetings. thank you very much. [applause] >> good evening, i am irvin. i am one of 15 core substitute teachers. we work at schools often covering the most difficult classrooms in the district. core substitutes are crede
as that is but that public safety means giving people the opportunity to have employment, the opportunity to educate themselves. public safety means that we don't take constitutional rights to the extreme and that while we may support the second amendment we have to support the fact that we have too many guns on the street. when we talk about making the city work for everyone, that it means helping our working families, our middle-class families that are struggling. if you look at what is happening throughout the city we have great wealth in san francisco that many people on the been pushed out. the city of st. francis has the lowest percentage of kids, lower than manhattan, -- i want to thank my colleagues to help the families can find the city more affordable. to have a city that works, you have to make sure the public education work for our kids. we have the highest performing urban school district in the entire state, and one of the highest performing urban school districts in the country and yet many kids especially kids of color are doing worse in san francisco than kids of col
, gay-rights, and did briefly mention education. >> no single person can trade of the single math and science teachers read for the future. we must harness new ideas to revamp the tax code and reform our schools and empower citizens with the skills they need to work harder and reach higher. lou: he did not actually say education but he did mention the word reform. he wants to change everything. if you believe the data the federal education department puts out you may think there is no need it only reflected the reality. the education department is a giddy that shows high-school graduation rate is 78-point to%. 70-point to% that is a 35 year, and not a high but the best this report, think about it. 21% is not getting it done. the education department also notes, about this, the national dropout rate is 3 percent overall down from 4% last year. are you kidding me? if only 78.2% are getting it done how does that end up at 3%? new mask? federal math? political math. is a joke not funny brought to by the department of education. a report from a nonprofit group last year told the differ
in support of the schools, education from pre-k to higher education; local hiring in jobs. i want to do my best to create good jobs, livable wage jobs, and healthy communities and that is a good piece of legislation moving for this year. i will continue to work with many of you in strengthening our public health protection not only in richmond district but in all of our communities and working with a small business leaders. to revitalize not only -- boulevard but balboa and clemente, revitalizing neighborhood corridors. i like to continue my work to improve the richmond district and make it livable for everyone, young and old, tenant, homeowners, immigrant families, small pop and mom businesses. i want to acknowledge that i am lucky to have three incredible staff from a legislative [indiscernible] (off mic). you have to look at the -- pieces of my campaign to understand that inside joke. a look forward to working with many of you on the issues that i raised. with this the first new board of supervisors, incredible people, i will do my part to move our city forward. thank you very m
an emergency occurs. substitutes are the relief pitcher in the baseball of education. substitutes are the understudies to the teachers that star on stage. in california there are several categories of substitutes. we will talk about core substitutes and return to other substitute issues at future meetings. thank you very much. [applause] >> good evening, i am irvin. i am one of 15 core substitute teachers. we work at schools often covering the most difficult classrooms in the district. core substitutes are credentialed and certified. or average time in the district serves the district well. principals and teachers trust and appreciate us for our experience in classroom management. our high expectations are student learning. and because we keep our students safe. assignments may be of short or long duration. sometimes we assign grades when necessary. we fill vacant positions until replacements are found. we consult with teachers before assignments in order to improve our classroom effectiveness. our professionalism, experience and dedication help the district achieve its goal of eq
challenge that harvard business school faces today? >> business education in america itself has become stagnant. all of the growth in business schools is in places like china and india and brazil and eastern europe. we're a great american business school in a great american century. people came to the united states because they thought that this was the center of management practice and management innovation. but now if you were to try and educate leaders who have to operate in the world in what i you this of as this new global century of business by teaching them just about american education, i think we would be irresponsible to our mission of educating leaders who make a difference in the world. >> in a nutshell the biggest challenge that you face is competition? >> yes. it seems surprising. you would think there isn't a competition for harvard business school, but people are coming up with different models. we have students, all 900 of our students in the first year are currently in january scattered all around the world, trying to understand globalization. they've all been asked t
commitment to education and assist businesss in noe valley on disability access requirements. the noe valley merchants' the association understands that continued disability outreach and education is about maintaining the economic preservation of their merchant corridor and it is the only merchants association in san francisco that has established a standing committee to develop comprehensive outreach -- excuse me. that establishes a standing committee and developed a comprehensive outreach and education program and assist businesses that are in pre-and post-litigation. the small business commission commends the noe valley merchants association as an outstanding merchants association not only for their dedication to the businesss in their districts, but also for being a strong citywide and statewide voice for businesses and individuals with disabilities around the issue of disability access compliance. so thank you. [ applause ] so i just have a few other notes. is that the noe valley merchants association has made this a standing committee. and they twice a month have an ongoing meeting, w
are part of the solution. in that effort both in advocacy we have a strong, strong goal of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means
of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but defi
it is -- yeah. 60 seconds there? [applause] >> and you, daniel, what is your 60-second idea? >> as an educator and teacher, i think my 60-second idea to change the world is better education. if we could teach the next generation of kids to be critical thinkers, just not accept what they are told but to decide for themselves, to give them the tools to make informed decisions about what is right and what is not, about what has been established and what is just here say, what really has a grounding in fact versus rumor, i think the world would be a much safer, more peaceful, and more prosperous place. [applause] >> let's get a big, final round of applause for this nice, informed foray into neuroscience and music with myself, daniel levinson, and the great guitarist and composer, alex degrassi. now, this meeting of in forum and the commonwealth club is adjourned. [applause] >> you're watching quick bites, a look at san francisco foods. today you're in for a real treat. oh, my. food inspired by the mediterranean and released with a twist so unique you can only find it in one place in san francisco.
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these
funds our priorities. it proposes an increase in funding for education. including full-day kindergarten and we fully fund the teachers pension each of the next two years. [applause] education funding represents 64% of our state expenditures. in addition, we provide $18 million over the next few years to ensure that all hoosier workers have the skills that they need to find a job in today's economy. [applause] since i believe that we need new jobs, we are investing nearly $350 million in excess reserves on indiana's roads and bridges and infrastructure of today and tomorrow. [applause] our budget creates a partnership and because indiana is agriculture, we envision our state becoming a hub of agricultural breakthroughs by supporting the development of an agricultural court order. indiana will continue to lead across the midwest and the world. [applause] our budget also ensures that the indiana economic development corporation is adequately equipped to attract more to the hoosier state and to operate with greater transparency and accountability to the public. [applause] lastly, it was abr
education. i want to thank you for that. i want to introduce my family. i'm getting emotional. first off my beautiful wife karen cepeda [sounds like]. (applause) together we have two kids, renee and emiliana who are in school today. we have been through what close couples go through in terms of raising kids and facing adversity and figuring out how to make a household work. it has been wonderful 15 years. my mom is year, linda parks and stepfather. (applause) i think that what i really got % most of all from my mom % is really how to think and be thoughtful about the people. and i take that with me wherever i go. i draw inspiration from being around people. i want to say thank you for my life and what you have given me. my stepfather joe has given me a great opportunity, never expected that and i want to thank you for that. i wanted to do is my dad, hector avalos. it's time for resemblance i tihnk, for the gray look. my dad is important to me as well and taught me about the value of work. working with other people and not just yourself. my sister is here, carol avalos who is a nu
. that there is one more thing. so the educational system in college. i think there should be services for financial aid for individuals with disabilities. as you are abruptly thrown into the world with lots of action going on and it's a very hard transition. particularly if you are furthering your education, for folks with disabilities, particularly with financial aid. this is why most individuals don't go to college. that is all, thank you. >> thank you. are there any council members who have a comment or question? go ahead idell. >> thank you. thank you everyone for coming out here today. i have to apologize, i have been sick, so i didn't even know that the meeting would have happened. i would have had a lot more people here. sorry about that, but the next time we do this, which i know this won't be last one, it will be go. what i wanted to say is having access -- she was talking about the internet -- having cable or something at a reasonable price. we have people with disabilities and seniors just siting this their house just looking at wall because they cannot afford cable or a telephone
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
can all agree when we began our careers in education, we did it because children deserved better. to thrive and placed in situations to be successful. our jobs. mine, yours, are to remove those obstacles in front of them. and to do our best to give them that path to success. moving this will place a major obstacle in their way. these are students that have dealt with years of ada construction. and last year there was a fire and they were without a cafeteria and not to mention lost every book in the library. they have had to endure so much. and those who could help, and you are about to throw a huge obstacle in our way. i ask is this the best you can do? have you consulted with all parties? are you proud of the work you have done, and the decisions you are about to make? in my opinion unless you have received the answers that you are satisfied with, then you hand the work back to them and say, try again. [applause] >> good evening, i am melissa, the president of the board of creative arts charter school. i appreciate the opportunity to give comment. but really i would rather not b
? >> the evidence is compelling, education, human capital, people can work with information and technology. and many people in american society today, cannot afford by themselves to get that kind of education. you can make resources available to support younger people and families that is good for them, that is good for the economy, and that is good for the tax base. it is going to strengthen the budget. >> in terms of competitiveness worldwide, building a stronger work force, as you mentioned, early childhood education to college education is vital to american competitiveness, suspect it? >> is the number one determining informant. how much do we produce in this economy? number one, looking forward is human capital, that is about education, the ability to innovate and work with the new technologies. >> over the short run, what is the effect of across the board cuts on pell grants on research funding--for medical research and scientific research? >> it is all going to be negative for growth and human capital. it is also going to give you negative impact on the budget. >> while the most immediate con
with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain difference or a picture of a scan or whatever it is, you
, there is nc better place to educate folks on the mysterious mushroom, even to people who at first glance don't think they have an affinity for them. >> well, i do get a lot of, like, "oh, i don't like mushrooms." you know, generally, it's like, "when i was a kid, my mom would feed me these ones in a can." and you're rdally talking about one variety of mushrooms. and we have 7 varieties of mushrooms. and i think there's a mushroom for everyone. >> they do, indeed, have a mushroom for everyone here, along with every mushroom product, book, or t-shirt you could imagine. but strivinc to find a niche among the foodies of the bay area, they are constantly introducing new and innovative products and getting folks like myself more informed about these mushroom-based products. >> keep them in the brown paper bag in the refrigerator, not in the crisper, and you have no problems with them. >> ok. >> these are the gray morels. and i usually love the flavor on them. >> these are what kind? >> gray morel. >> oh. >> you know, generally, you want something, when you pick it up, it doesn't feel like it's gon
, and any of you who doubt the power of public education, it is great, i can tell you that. we raise her family and a century-old farmhouse in the yakima valley. i'd also like you to meet my three boys and their families, connor, joe, jack and his wife megan, our grandson brody, and the newest inslee, zoe ann. [applause] this is a very special day for my family. all of our elected families. and this is a very special time for many other families in our state for this reason. people all across washington stood up for fairness and family in approving marriage equality last november. we should all be proud. [applause] we should all be proud. the vote on referendum 74 represents the best of who we are as a state. it should be an inspiration for the progress we can make, always towards equality, always towards fairness, always towards justice all across the state of washington. it has been an amazing journey over the past year and a half, as i've traveled to all corners of the state. i am a 5th generation son of the state of washington, and am proud to have roots in this state that are as wid
with the municipality department of department of building inspection and also for ongoing outreach education, helping businesses in compliance with their construction-related accessibility improvements. of the dollar, $0.70 is to stay in the local municipality. $0.30 goes to the state. 5% of that $0.70 goes to administering and processing of collecting the dollar and the rest of the 65% comes back to working on inspectors and helping get inspectors become inspectors with the department of building inspection and our outreach education ongoing and helping businesses comply with the construction-related accessibility requirements. so dbi and i have started a conversation just about how we're going to be constructing working with the funds. obviously right now there is not going to be much money. we'll probably see what after may, when the business registration is due from businesses just how much the allotment will be there. and how much annually we'll be able to work with. maximum probably -- it's probably going to be in the $65,000 range per year, with the average of about 80,000 registered busine
identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by leading them to a path of self- determination. >> it is the mayor's youth employment program. the mayor has made a commitment to employ as many youth as possible. that is something that we hope will help. i want to thank all of our panelists today. give them a round of applause. [applause] >> the way we structured this panel, a short presentation to introduce the topic of neuroscience. then we will go to ask questions of all the different members. [applause] >> thank you very much for that kind introduction, for the invitation. i am a narrow scientists. i studied your -- i am a new row scientist. i study your brain. what neuroscience might have to offer in terms of understanding indivi
and work with our education institution so that we can better ourselves. we get child care to help us support the jobs that we need to build for our families. and i know as your kids growing up, they're going to understand these things more and more as they take up more responsibilities, right now keeping you from your brand-new bedrooms clean. [laughter] >> helping mom with the dishes, cleaning up to get your education to be the best person you want to be and go for the jobs you always wanted to have. this is the promise we have. it isn't just the physical structure. i know ms. youngblood and i know all of the people that have been invested in this dream know it for sure, that it takes a really whole community to do this. that's why we had such a great development team that came together and worked with us. john stewart, john is right here being led with his development team. we have howard here as well. you have the ridge point, which is i think the most mature of the housing managers here, ridge point's been around since '68, right? >> that's right. >> and all of you amassed togeth
to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track
of that $1.4 million is to move forward with the customer notification and education plan associated with the clean power s.f. program. i should note that at the end of november, our commission held a joint meeting and the primary agenda item during that discussion was customer notification and education plan. our commission officially endorsed the proposal. we got a lot of excellent feedback
an extensive public outreach in education campaign. was there any discussion how they will reach immigrant communities? >> you'll see in the budget for the customer outreach notification plan is part of the budget. some of that the work will happen by things that davis and associates does. some of it will be pc. it will also having some partnership with community-based organizations who have a much more direct relationship with low income communities, communities of color, non-english speaking community. plus all of the educational materials we have done, will be in multiple languages. one of the things that we will be reaching out to the board over the next couple months is to also get a sense from you in your district, who are the community-based organizations that particularly reach those community that's are hardest to reach so that we're connected with them and we're partnering. make sure that everyone is informed about the benefits and the financial costs associated with clean power s.f. >> i want to thank you for choosing mlb in this process as well. >> thank you very much. thanks m
and celebrate it because it's the bedrock of our country's success. on education, the president of the united states has an opportunity to strengthen our classrooms and recommit to public education in this country, our teachers, so we can compete in a global market. now, for the republicans, they have vilified all of these institutions. they think that tax cuts for the wealthy and deregulation is exactly how we should run the country, and that's it. president obama actually accomplished a heck of a lot in his first term. but there is so much more he can do on a number of important issues facing our country in the second term. we are a center-left country. we are progressive. progressives are in the majority. we have to think like that as a movement. we have to think like that as a people. and the chatter across the street, we learned one thing about those folks during the 2012 election. they lie. they do a pretty good job of it. so when we start going down the road of immigration reform and climate change and fair taxation and public education, we'll get plenty of lies from the right, because
there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional experience with the supervisor and everybody here, in our law enforcement, and in our health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more. and this is w
of education going down. that was the third concern. there are a few locations where the more than 450 affordable housing units would be built but the walnut orchard near highway 17 and highway 85 is the one where many feel building more homes will turn an already congested area into a bumper-to-bumper traffic nightmare. the neighborhood is a one way in and one way out and there's worry property values will go down if high density housing comes to the area. families with children are concerned about increasing class size with the schools. they have a great reputation and the fears affordable housing will attract more families who want to give their kids a better education. one word we heard a few times tonight. segregation. some worried about putting housing in one area will create a visible division between the high income parts of los gatos and the more affordable parts. >> this has to be spread so they can have access to shops and to downtown, to did you have kind of schools. this should not be all in one location, not to create a ghetto if you will or a cluster of, oh, these people
an education -- [applause] >> i guess the question is of fairness. you shouldn't have two systems, one where based on your race or class you can access treatment and move on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma
during the darkest periods in our shared history? will the commend the work of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and a developed country and raising his find -- final issue and praising the holocaust education trust. absolutely brilliant organization that make sure young people from schools across our country get the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible events of the holocaust took place. i had privileges we could meeting with a survivor whose story was truly heroic and truly heartbreaking. but who in her 90s is still making these arguments in making this case so that future generations will and. we should also learn not just about the european holocaust but what has happened recently in rwanda, in bosnia, in cambodia and elsewhere that tragically there is far too much prejudice in our world. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, can i join the prime minister in thing to be to kingsman david robert shaw of first battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment. each of the utmost courage and bravery and the condol
to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs.
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
. i have worked with republican governors to pass balanced budget while protecting of education and vital health care programs. it's really the same principled debate that's happening here, how to balance the budget but do it in ways that are responsible and that protect the middle class, that protect medicare and social security, but also reached across the aisle and do it in ways that are constructive and that allowance to reach compromise together. host: you mentioned your service in the state legislature in nevada. why come to washington? what can you do differently than you can back home? guest: our legislature in nevada is a citizens legislature. we met every other year. in addition to being a legislator, i work full time. i'm husband and father of three. this gives me an opportunity to serve my constituents 100% of the time. extremely humbling and honoring experience to be here. host: the debt ceiling vote, scheduled to see that happen today. how do you plan to vote? and once your opinion? guest: we really need a longer- term policy that allows greater certainty particula
talked about the government that we won which is infrastructure, education, regulation and the good things and recognize the government can't solve all the problems, i thought that was a reaching out, if you will, a shout to the tea party right that's rejectionist. >> as we saw in pennsylvania, and professional that morning there's so much of this willingness to win the election by the republicans, they know they're headed into trouble. many like lebanon, take the fences down. okay, we're never going to be popular again so we're going to have to rig it. >> sean: so it's the gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections. that's how bad nbc's gotten, that's the coverage. >> a couple of points about this quote, unquote news network and this quote, unquote newsman. on the gettysburg address, chris mathews has it it exactly wrong. he has the opposite. the gettysburg address was an attempt at healing of nation' wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech yesterday was a left wing declaration of war against the movement. and it was opposite. after the r
the reaching out really happens. he wants to and i want to see him really invest in educating our children. that means universal preschool education. that's true for somebody in rural alabama and in detroit. we really need to invest in infrastructure. he talked about that. that's good for all of america to physically be able to compete in the global economy. but there must be a pathway to jobs for those who are too often left behind. we absolutely have to create a pathway to citizenship. we have to go beyond the dream act to really including people so that not only are they able to contribute but the nation is able to benefit. we need to raise the minimum wage. we need to index it to inflation. these are things that aren't just the people who are black and latino. these are all americans. i think this reaching across requires that we see ourselves and the other. if we can see ourselves in the other, we realize that the agenda for those who are too often left behind is an american agenda >> brown: i have to point out that here we are talking about divided washington, right? divided america
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